Nutrition Guide. Use the information in this guide and the green Simple Nutrition tags in our stores to easily find the nutrition benefits of the foods you buy.
categories
Beverages
Beverages
Beverages such as juices and soy milk help hydrate the body. 100% fruit and vegetable juices count toward the MyPlate Fruit and Vegetable Groups. Watch juice portion sizes because it’s easy to drink too many calories. Many soy milks are fortified with calcium and vitamin D.
Dairy
Dairy
Milk, yogurt and cheese are rich in bone-building calcium, potassium, protein and other nutrients. MyPlate recommends choosing low-fat and fat-free versions to get the most nutrition for the fewest calories. Eggs are an economical and easy-to-make source of protein.
Deli Foods
Deli
Visit the deli for a quick lunch or dinner. Load sandwiches with veggies like lettuce and tomato and choose broth-based soups to trim fat and calories. Pick salads with lots of fruits and veggies to get vitamins, minerals and fiber, too. Choose reduced-fat dressings.
Fresh Fruits
Fresh Fruits
Focus on fruits: they’re sweet, delicious and full of nutrients needed for good health. Whole fruits make great snacks and desserts. Or, serve them sliced, diced or pureed in favorite recipes. Pick a variety of colorful fruits to get the most nutrition benefits.
Fresh Vegetables
Fresh Vegetables
Add more vegetables to your day and reap their range of nutrients. Vary your veggies by eating lots of colors: dark-green, deep-yellow, red, orange and white. Fresh veggies make crunchy snacks. Enjoy them in main dishes, side dishes and salads, too.
Frozen Foods
Frozen Foods
When time is tight, your freezer is your friend. Stock whole-wheat waffles and pancakes for speedy breakfasts. Serve a quick meal with low-fat frozen entrees or a veggie-topped pizza. Frozen fruits and vegetables are super-nutritious because they're picked and packed at their peak.
Grains
Grains
Grain products such as cereal, bread, pasta and tortillas provide vitamins and minerals. Make at least half your grains whole grains. Try whole-wheat bread and pasta, whole-grain cereal, barley, brown rice, bulgur and quinoa, too. Enjoy baked goods like cakes and pies in moderation.
Meats and Meat Alternatives
Meat & Meat Alternatives
These foods are packed with protein and nutrients. Go lean with protein: reduce saturated fat and cholesterol by choosing lean cuts of beef and pork, and eating poultry without the skin. Soy burgers and tofu are alternatives for vegetarians or meat-eaters seeking a change of taste.
Oils and Dressings
Oils & Dressings
Most vegetable oils and many types of mayonnaise and salad dressing are high in good fats and low in bad (saturated) fats. All oils contain about 120 calories per tablespoon, so watch portion size. Light and fat-free mayonnaise and salad dressing help trim calories and fat.
Pantry Staples
Pantry Staples
Keep these convenient foods on hand. Canned fruits and veggies are packed with vitamins and minerals. Canned seafood and beans add protein to meals. Choose broth-based soups and plain tomato sauce to trim fat. Peanut butter supplies protein and good fats. Select items lowest in sodium.
Seafood
Seafood
Fish and other seafood are famed for being high in protein and low in saturated fat. Fatty fish like salmon contain beneficial omega-3 fatty acids. To promote heart health, eat seafood at least twice a week. Bake, poach, grill or microwave it instead of frying.
Sweet and Salty Snacks
Sweet & Salty Snacks
Snacks can be an enjoyable part of a healthful eating plan. Choose cookies, crackers, bars, chips and pretzels that contain whole grains. Nuts contain mostly good fats. Popcorn is a whole-grain food with fiber. Avoid oversized portions to keep a lid on calories and fat.
This is not medical advice and should not replace consultation with your doctor.